Walking through Kalbadevi, Mumba Devi temple in Mumbai


Beautiful old building at Kalbadevi, Mumbai

Beautiful old building at Kalbadevi, Mumbai

It represents all that Mumbai is – order amid the perceived chaos, a mish-mash of the old and new, the meeting ground of the poor and rich, the hub of never-ending activity and a place that all kinds of people call home.

This is Kalbadevi in Mumbai, an area named after a female deity called Kalbadevi.

There are people pulling hand carts, hollering to get you out of their way – otherwise they lose momentum and re-starting does not involve just turning the ignition key. You hear their sweaty breath, see their tense muscles and wonder whether it would all be worth it at the end of the day.

Boxed In

Boxed In

Then, there are those who linger at stalls that sell paan or betel leaf in countless flavours. There are those who barely have enough time to grab a bite at unpretentious, roadside eateries and those whose only entertainment is people watching. You see men hurrying to work and holy men inside temples, waiting for patrons whose day they can bless, while fumes from the incense lazily curl up through the air.

Bless you, shall I?

Bless you, shall I?

Frieze on a betel leaf/paan shop

Frieze on a betel leaf/paan shop

Located north of Crawford Market, Kalbadevi is a really old locality of Mumbai city. Crumbling buildings like the historically significant Swadeshi Market, defaced by plants jutting out of crevices and roosting pigeons making gurgling noises remind you of the heritage we are just not capable of handling or willing to preserve. Pavements filled with key makers, barbers and cobblers and people eating, walking, haggling, struggling , sleeping, laughing…….carry on sustaining the daily lives of inhabitants and visitors alike.

Swadeshi Market, a historic market in Kalbadevi

Swadeshi Market, a historic market in Kalbadevi

Key Maker at Kalbadevi, Mumbai

Key Maker at Kalbadevi, Mumbai

Quite a sight!

Quite a sight!

Kalbadevi houses Zaveri Bazar that sells diamond and other jewellery, Mangaldas Market, a textiles hub and Chor Bazaar that is famous/infamous for antiques, second hand stuff and counterfeits (called duplicate items in India). As a result, you see all kinds of wares when you walk the lanes – steel boxes piled up as high as gravity will allow, ‘Made in China’ electronics and toys, fresh fruits and veggies, chunky ‘not expensive but looks expensive’ kind of jewellery, beautiful saris, metal utensils etc.

Piled high

Stacked up

Faux Jewels

Faux Jewels

Real Threads

Real Threads

I was visiting the area for lunch at Shree Thakker Bhojanalaya. The restaurant serves a thali, the food portion of which would leave many less-than-brave hearts clutching their tummies. For the uninitiated, a ‘thali’ comprises a large plate with several katories/vatis (bowls) for savoury items like daal (pulses), vegetable curry, kadhi (tempered curd) and desserts like gulab jamun, kheer, shrikhand etc. Snacks, rice and rotis/chapatis are also served. The price per thali is fixed (around 300 rupees i.e. less than 5 US dollars during our visit) and you can eat as much or as little as you like. Unlike the Western tradition of phased out courses, the courses in this case are served in quick succession as waiters float in bearing their gifts one after the other. (HEALTHY TIP – Don’t fill up on snacks and ghee – wait for the rotis which come later. Ask for the amazing jowari, makka and  bajra rotis).

The restaurant - Thakker Bhojanalaya

The restaurant – Thakker Bhojanalaya. I love their message – we will pay heed to all your requests, will you accept just one of ours? – Please don’t waste food

The Great Indian Food Challenge - The Thali

The Great Indian Food Challenge – The Thali

As I and my friend took a post-lunch stroll, we chanced upon a hidden gem – a Gujarati temple named ‘Dwarkadheesh temple’. The reason it was so different will be clear from the pictures below.

Dwarkadheesh Temple, Kalbadevi, Mumbai

Dwarkadheesh Temple, Kalbadevi, Mumbai

The Guards/Dwaarapaal at Dwarkadheesh Temple

The Guards/Dwaarapaal at Dwarkadheesh Temple

I was not permitted to take pictures inside but, the old worldly ambiance with women putting together garlands for the evening puja, the smell of incense and the calm atmosphere was totally at odds with the world outside. Having come so far, we decided to visit the Kalbadevi temple. A word of caution here – the temple being tiny is very easy to miss so, keep asking for directions as you go. The good part is that there are no vendors to hassle you and it is not very crowded. It seems like a place that the nearby residents visit more often than other Mumbaiites.

Kalba Devi temple at Kalbadevi, Mumbai

Kalba Devi temple at Kalbadevi, Mumbai

Having visited one famed temple, we decided to visit the other one too. Mumba Devi is the goddess from whom the city Mumbai derives its name. The scene was not very different from the Siddhi Vinayak temple in Prabhadevi. After paying obeisance, we left with a post card bearing the image of the goddess/Devi (since photography is not permitted at the temple).

Mumba Devi after whom Mumbai, the city, is named

Mumba Devi after whom Mumbai, the city, is named

Believe it or not, this was my first visit to both the temples in the 15 years that I have spent in Mumbai. I intend visiting again soon. What about you?

How to get there?

You can take a taxi from anywhere in Mumbai city (though the cost could be prohibitive depending on how far you are staying). If you want to take a suburban train, get off at Masjid Bunder station on the Central line or Marine Lines of the Western line and just walk down from there.

There are local BEST buses that will take you to Fort area, Flora Fountain, Victoria Terminus or Churchgate. You could then take a taxi or depending on your energy levels, walk from there.

See more pictures on my Flickrstream – http://www.flickr.com/photos/vibharavi-at-pixelvoyages/sets/72157635310743912/

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4 responses to “Walking through Kalbadevi, Mumba Devi temple in Mumbai

  1. Thanks, this is a fascinating photo essay on the Kalbadevi crowd scenes and environs, feels like one was there, the pictures throb with realism as they capture the dizzying vitality of the places, temples and heritage buildings, and though you have put in quite a few pix, one is left asking for more, what a fun & rewarding walk you have had- with a camera in your hands- we enjoyed walking with you, shows what a treat downtown Bombay is for those who, like you, know where to look….keep them coming…. K Ganesh

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